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Miles Lee
Miles Lee

CASE: Animatronics



CASE Animatronics follows the story of John Bishop, an overworked police officer working for Aurora Police Department. He is contacted by Scott, a mysterious figure who was involved in on of John's past cases, who seeks revenge against John and has trapped him inside the building with his murderous animatronics. John must use his flashlight, his witts, and his Tablet to avoid being eaten by the rampaging machines and find a way to escape the building.




CASE: Animatronics



Five Nights at Freddy's is everyone's favorite YouTube baiting murder simulator starring animatronics and a desk fan. As such, it has spawned many imitators, The majority of which (including titles like Five Nights at Candy's or One Night at Flumpty's) are free and made by loyal fans as tributes to the original. CASE: Animatronics, on the other hand, is a complete game for purchase on Steam. Fortunately, it is not an exact clone like the others. You aren't stuck in a single room only capable of closing doors and looking at cameras but are instead required to maneuver a law enforcement office for reasons which are never made entirely clear. You are not a humble security guard but a hardened and experienced detective, who for some reason lacks any weapon or the ability to walk out the front door. If you thought the storyline of Five Nights at Freddy's was confusing and convoluted, you're right, and CASE: Animatronics really wanted to emulate that. The developers also emulated everything else about Five Nights at Freddy's as well, while still trying to produce an original creation. Unfortunately, any attempts at originality inevitably fail, and even the parts the game copied don't come out great.


CASE: Animatronics is the story of a detective who awakens at the office to find a crazed man he once failed to help is seeking revenge in the most convoluted way - by locking him in a building with animatronics he has gifted with confusing artificial intelligence. The detective then takes the most logical route and almost cheerfully goes along with the mad man's plan, instead of calling in backup or even just walking out the front door. This is not just a silly suggestion by the way. In Five Nights at Freddy's, people commonly joke that a normal person wouldn't go back to work or would even leave on the spot in those conditions, but at least there you are trapped in a room. In CASE: Animatronics, you can actually walk to the glass front door which may be locked, but you could clearly easily break through. If you are trapped in a building with murderous robots and have video evidence, that is probably a good reason to just break the door down. This may seem a minor thing to harp on, but most horror games will at least board up your escapes and actually ensure that you feel trapped.


There isn't a lot to comment on gameplay-wise. It is really that basic - you hide in lockers or under desks from the animatronics who either will not see you unless you are right in front of them or will somehow see you through walls. The cameras are marginally useful but the animatronics all have audial clues too and after a while, it's easier to run around and never really run into them. The best part of the stealth is there seems to be a mechanic where if you hide in the same place too long or too many times, the animatronics will figure out you're there. The first time they find you, it is admittedly terrifying. It does get old after a while. There are minigames to mix things up, but they're noticeably trite. The lock picking one, in particular, is an unabashed rip-off of Fallout 3 that works just as you'd expect.


Now, it's hard to criticize the story too much because it's barely there at all, but let's pick at it. The characters are unbelievably annoying and what's worse, they make no sense half the time. Particularly, the villain swaps liberally between a calculating mastermind bent on revenge and a gleeful psychopath with a fetish for animatronics. The two aren't necessarily mutually exclusive but it doesn't feel natural in-game. The dialogue reminded me of Stasis, as it was boring and way too expositional at every step. The protagonist even feels the need to narrate half his movements fo no real reason. That said, I did love the villain's voice acting. Not because he was frightening, intimidating, or even made me uncomfortable - he was just so cheesy that it was amusing. Clearly, the guy enjoyed doing that voice work, and it was at least entertaining. Same goes for the main voice actor as far as that goes - neither are what you would call objectively good but they clearly had a good time doing it and to be honest it was more entertaining than the game itself, even if it was all in the wrong way. It makes you think the story was supposed to be C-list storytelling, a throwback to the old fashioned bad horror tropes, but at other times it seems to take itself a little too seriously.


Then there is the ending. Spoiler warning, but there is none. In fact, it's kind of confusing when the game ends because you don't quite know it has ended at first. You find a keycard, and then the animatronics just sort of stop chasing you. The villain's final words to you don't really sound final. It feels like there was supposed to be another piece to the game, but that's not here. You just walk out the door (again - why didn't this just happen before) and you leave. There isn't even any commentary or statement from the detective. No closure whatsoever. Even by horror standards, it is a bizarre non-ending.


Everything about this game feels like a classic bad scary movie, from the common tropes to the hilariously bad acting, and it's hard to tell if it was intended to be like that. It doesn't have the sort of unique charm Five Nights at Freddy's had where it relied on the more untapped fears of Chuck E Cheese and Disneyland animatronics, and because of the unique idea of forcing players into the most helpless position possible to increase the risk (and stress). There is really nothing unique in CASE: Animatronics. Aside from the nice atmosphere which is kind of ruined by the awkward goofiness of the voice acting and story, nothing stands out at all. It just feels like all the boring parts of other horror games meshed together.


this is the first out of five case animatronics models somebody has released the 1st game models but not the second game ones so i am releasing them for free on sketchfabif there are any problems with the model add me on discord and dm melewis#1912


You play as John Bishop, an overworked police officer working for Aurora Police Department. Shortly after waking up from a horrific nightmare, he is contacted by Scott, a mysterious figure who was involved in one of John's past cases, who seeks revenge against John and has trapped him inside the building with his murderous animatronics. Now he must use only his flashlight, his tablet, and his wits to help him avoid getting eaten and survive until 3AM.


  • Tropes that apply to both games Hell Is That Noise: The animatronics screech in your face when they catch you.

  • Since they are heavy, metal machines, they make loud, clanking footsteps.

  • Jump Scare: To be expected from a FNAF-inspired game.

  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: The animatronics all have glowing red eyes. Considering the protagonists spend most of their time in dark rooms, sometimes this is all they can see.



Blue Yoshi: The story of Case Animatronics is weird, and since the 2nd game isn't finished then we can't really get a grasp of the story. The best we can say is that these animatronics are created to go after a man who did something. That's the best I can sum it up, so without futher to do let's analyze these robots.


Blue Yoshi: Yes, and combining the shared abilities, and comparing her to the other animatronics then it safe to assume that The Owl is the strongest in this team. She can move without making any type of noise, can teleport, and induce hallucinations. 041b061a72


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